"Though both are bound in the spiral dance, I would rather be a cyborg than a goddess." – Donna Haraway

Interesting CFP originally posted on The Fan Studies Network.

The Fan Studies Network

Engaging the Woman Fantastic in Contemporary American Media Culture

Full name / name of organization:

Elyce Rae Helford (senior editor), Mick Howard, Sarah Gray-Panesi, Shiloh Carroll / Middle Tennessee State University

Contact email:

ewfcollection@gmail.com

The past thirty years have offered a growing and changing body of scholarship on images of fantastic women in American popular culture.  Collections from Marleen Barr’s Future Females (1981) and Future Females: The Next Generation (2000) to Elyce Rae Helford’s Fantasy Girls: Gender and the New Universe of Science Fiction and Fantasy Television (2000) and Sherrie Inness’s Action Chicks: New Images of Tough Women in Popular Culture (2004) have offered multifaceted commentary on ways in which contemporary media culture posits and positions “empowered” women in speculative fictions.  Engaging the Woman Fantastic in Contemporary Media Culture takes part in this tradition and brings it to the present day with emphasis on texts from the 1990s to the…

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I don’t think I ever posted here that I started a Facebook page for The Spiral Dance a few months back. I use it to post interesting articles or news about which I don’t have time to write fully fleshed out posts. Hence, it is updated much more frequently than the blog.

There have been some good conversations there so far. I invite you to check it out!

https://www.facebook.com/thespiraldanceblog

10 fellowships for women to attend the Open Hardware Summit, applications close August 18th | The Ada Initiative.

Deadline to apply is end of the day on August 18th.

The summit has quite a few speakers on topics related to my interests though I do find myself hesitating. It is frustrating that there are no speaker bios or images. As I was looking through the names of the speakers, I noticed that while there are some women among the speakers, the numbers are far from gender-balanced. Also, of the names with which I am familiar, they were all white women.

So I did some digging. I am going to tell you right up front: this is far from perfect or definitive. I am going off appearances in photos, which can be misleading and personal identification of racial identity is a tricky thing. Not to mention all of the problems with defining whiteness.

Based on an admittedly imperfect methodology, I found:

Read the rest of this entry »

CALL FOR PROPOSALS – Hip hop and punk feminisms.

This CFP came across the FemTechNet listserv last night or this morning.

Proposals due in August and conference is in December. I love the potential here. If MLA weren’t only a month later I would be trying to work up something to apply!

Note that papers at the conference will be considered for publication in an edited anthology.

 

I saw this on HASTAC and it seemed like readers here might know lots of possible nominees!

http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/06/18/nominate-white-house-champion-change-tech-inclusion#ToddPark

A Champion’s work may involve:

  • Being a positive role model in their community for younger kids.

  • Dedicating time to helping build programs and outlets that specifically engage youth from underrepresented communities in technology.

  • Taking time to mentor and inspire youth to think about a future career in technology.

  • Establishing programs that help connect youth with internships and job opportunities in the tech sector.

  • Working with libraries, museums, or other non-school partners to build

  • Maker spaces, design studios, or other safe spaces for using technology.

  • Building programs that recognize and honor young men and women for their accomplishments and interest in technology.

The deadline for nominations is July 1.

http://hastac.org/opportunities/cfp-race-gender-and-sexuality-video-game-studies

This edited collection is interested in rethinking the role of race, gender, and sexuality in video game studies beyond typically reductive or divisive debates. Abstracts are due July 15, 2013 with full papers in October.

Smokey the Bear cautions readers that only they can prevent brohavior

Image mashup based on “only you…” by flickr user dreamymo

Today I have really stretched my powers of procrastination. I have voraciously read Twitter, engaged in multiple discussions on Facebook, and even *gasp* read a bunch of saved content on Instapaper (surely a sign of the apocalypse?). The problem is, I am not fooling myself. I know I have been avoiding writing this post. I feel conflicted about it even as I sit down to write it. I think I may even be procrastinating by talking about procrastination. Because the truth is, this post is uncomfortable to write.

It’s uncomfortable because I wish 100 things had gone differently. And it is uncomfortable because I am going to critique some people who I think were actually trying to be nice. But I think this cautionary tale needs to be told.

Once upon a time, there was a princessno, a kick-ass superheroine…in reality, an ordinary professional woman. This woman had worked really hard to earn a doctorate and had been really fortunate to land a tenure track position teaching and conducting research at a university. Her field has much to do with media and technology. As a result of this, the woman often finds herself in contact with people outside of the Ivory Tower of academia. And she generally thinks this is a good thing. In fact, she values opportunities to engage outside the university.

So the woman was intrigued when she received an invitation to a discussion-based event from a friendly professional contact. This contact is a smart, innovative, and friendly person, but not a career academic (let’s refer to him as “Contact” from here on out). The idea Contact was pitching the woman was that his friend, “Organizer,” chooses a topic and brings together an eclectic group of people to discuss it. The woman’s male colleague was supposed to participate, but he was going to be out of town and Contact thought she would be a good replacement. The woman was initially a bit skeptical of this event. Though she knows about the topic, it is not her primary area of expertise. And Contact actually made things a bit worse by emphasizing how “exclusive” the event was to be. The exclusivity was actually kind of antithetical to the openness and sharing the woman typically values. But Contact really seemed to want her to attend and assured her it would be rewarding. So she reluctantly agreed.

Ok, so everyone gets that it is me, right? So I can drop the third person? It’s getting to be a bit cumbersome.

Weeks passed. Though I remained somewhat hesitant, I kept my word and went to the event. I was a bit late due to traffic and was flustered when I arrived. When I walked into the room, Organizer, Contact, and the three other participants were already seated and engaged in conversation. Cue more fluster: I was the only woman. For those playing along at home, that’s 5 men, 1 woman.

Image of three pairs of sunglasses and one hat from Sesame Street's

One of these things is not like the others

I momentarily considered leaving. Instead I chose a seat and met the others. Organizer noted that the other person who was supposed to be there (also a man) could not make it. Had my male colleague not had a conflict, there would have been no women present. There was then an awkward formal-ish introduction period in which Organizer said he would introduce each participant, suggesting that he would save everyone the embarrassment of speaking about themselves. Except Organizer didn’t really know me. So he instead asked Contact to do it. It was a strange thing to be in that room, already feeling like a part of the Sesame Street game “One of these things is not like the others,” and being spoken for in a way that, though kind and complimentary, is not how I would have chosen to articulate myself. Of the other participants, Guy1 and Guy2 were local entrepreneurs. Guy3 was also a professor, though in a very different discipline. Read the rest of this entry »

http://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/node/51447

This seems like an interesting opportunity to explore the ways that women may be leveraging the web to make money. The book seems to be looking for advice and experience and aimed at a general audience, rather than critical analysis for an academic audience. It would be interesting to see both grouped together.

http://csws.uoregon.edu/wp-content/docs/grants/Le_Guin_Fellowship_guidelines.pdf

This seems pretty cool. The Knight Library at U of Oregon has lots of interesting special collections, including LeGuin’s papers (and coming soon: James Tiptree Jr.’s papers!) Open to scholars at all stages or in various types of careers. Deadline is Sept 1, 2013.

Calling all Feminist Scholars! HASTAC Workshop for you!

This upcoming HASTAC Feminist Scholars workshop looks like it could be really great! In true feminist fashion, I am already over committed next week so I can’t participate. I hope they do another one over the summer!

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